Effort to ban Trump from Minnesota primary ballot shot down by state’s supreme court

Effort to ban Trump from Minnesota primary ballot shot down by state’s supreme court

The Minnesota Supreme Court announced Wednesday that it has dismissed a lawsuit and will allow former President Donald Trump to stay on the primary ballot.

The court dismissed the lawsuit which it stated was seeking an end to Trump’s candidacy under a rarely-used constitutional provision that forbids those who ‘engaged in insurrection’ from holding office.

With this ruling, the Minnesota Supreme Court has refused to become the first in history to use Section 3 of the 14th Amendment to prevent someone from running for the presidency. 

By ruling that state law allows parties to put who ever they want on the primary ballot, the Minnesota Supreme court dodged the question of the lawsuit — does Trump’s alleged role in the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol disqualify him from the presidency?

‘There is no state statute that prohibits a major political party from placing on the presidential nomination primary ballot, or sending delegates to the national convention supporting, a candidate who is ineligible to hold office,’ Chief Justice Natalie Hudson stated. 

However, the court left the possibility open that plaintiffs could again try to knock Trump off the general election ballot in November. 

Officials say the Minnesota challenge was filed by the liberal group Free Speech For People, which said it will continue its campaign to end Trump’s presidential bid.

The ruling is also the first from a series of lawsuits filed by Free Speech For People and a second liberal group that are seeking to use Section 3 to end Trump’s candidacy in the Republican presidential primary.

‘Ridiculous 14th Amendment lawsuit just thrown out by Minnesota Supreme Court.’ He added, ‘Congratulations to all who fought this HOAX!’ Trump posted on his social media platform, Truth Social, following the ruling.

Many legal experts expect the issue to eventually reach the U.S. Supreme Court, which has never ruled on Section 3.

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